Rome’s airport lounge and some final photos.

We are heading home.  A three hour delay was announced with a phone call at 4:08AM…just the kind of jarring sound and information that makes sleep a bit more restless.  Luckily, we rearranged our ride to the airport with the Staffords to be a bit later.  Even though we are taking off at 3PM instead of 12 noon, the “local airport” asks us to have our baggage checked by 11AM (one hour before the original flight time).  A strange request, but one with which we decide to comply…”those who have the planes set the rules”.

We missed sending you some good photos, so I’ll go find them.  This first is a “kids and sandwich” shot, which could be anywhere in the world….but it was taken the day we visited St. Francis’ tiny niche retreat at Le Celle outside the walls of Cortona.  We don’t know what they were doing here, but the teachers had the good sense to get them quietly eating lunch before they did it.

1,000 photos; this may be the best.  Kids and sandwiches at Le Celle.  They were studying St. Francis, too.
1,000 photos; this may be the best. Kids and sandwiches at Le Celle. They were studying St. Francis, too.

(just a reminder that you can click on this or any photo to make it bigger, then go back by using the “back button”…usually in the top left corner of your device’s screen.)

Next is the Borgo di Carpiano’s high security locking system.  Each of the ten rooms has “one key”.  Every time you come to the “church” for drinks or dining, or when you leave the premises, the key goes on a hook down by the door.  Not exactly high security, but it makes the maids understand that you are not in your room and they can do clean up for you.

The ribbon color identifies it as the key to this particular room.  They have no duplicate keys.
The ribbon color identifies it as the key to this particular room. They have no duplicate keys.
The key on the left must be the
The key on the left must be the “short white” vs. the “long white” ribbon on the right.

We are constantly amazed at the violation of personal space which occurs on every highway here.  It makes slowing down to take a photo seem like a capital offense to them.  And, it certainly presents terror in your rear view mirror.

This is the typical Italian drivers' version of
This is the typical Italian drivers’ version of “far enough back”.
Remember the Zeppelin restaurant in Orvieto?  The owner/chef was such a character that he gave each family an apron.  Tim Roach had his on and displayed the cookbook before we got to our car in the lot.
Remember the Zeppelin restaurant in Orvieto? The owner/chef was such a character that he gave each family an apron. Tim Roach had his on and displayed the cookbook before we got to our car in the lot.
Perhaps the craziest thing we encountered in Italy was this welcome poster in the lobby of La Tufa, the little in-town local restaurant within walking distance of our Villa in Ossaia.  No one speaks English in this place and we never found out the  reason for it.  But, we never failed to laugh when we came in there.
Perhaps the craziest thing we encountered in Italy was this welcome poster in the lobby of La Tufa, the little in-town local restaurant within walking distance of our Villa in Ossaia. No one speaks English in this place and we never found out the reason for it. But, we never failed to laugh when we came in there.

Going to find the Staffords for lunch now.  They have been scouting out wine bars.

Ciao.

chiproach

Lifelong Philadelphia area Realtor. Now a 10-year citizen of Sanibel, Florida. Married to Nancy for 53 years. Three children (2 in Devon; 1 in Steamboat Springs, CO) and 5 grandkids. Helping with charities involving poverty, kids and education.

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